Twitter wars make my day

Two publishers got into a fight and it was amazing

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A rat in a cage (Indy vs traditional publishing)

Publishing is a game. You learn that early in your studies if you go through an university. Be it an scholarly  journal or creative writing, it’s all hoops you have to jump through to establish yourself and further your career. And the more you become engrossed in it, the more you realized it’s not just about talent, but who you know and how much press they will get for publishing you…..

Why is it that way? Because they say so.

Now, I’m not sure who they are. Though I suspect it might be the publishers and those profiting off of mine and yours work….

I also think that’s partly why being an indie writer is so looked down up.

plays

Ok, we will get it out of the way. The problem with vanity press is that anyone can do it. And frankly there are so god-awful works that in my opinion see the light of day. There are also a lot of scams, and publishers that try to hide that you will be footing the bill,  so if you do wanna pursue vanity press, research it and do it because you want your work out there…..

But if you do self-publish in any form, expect to be look down upon for it.

“Oh you’re an author, who published your work?”

“….I did…”

Awkward silence…..

That might be my least favorite part about the writing game. This weird need that most artist have to inflate their own work at the cost of others. I remember excitedly telling a professor of my first real publication (in a fairly respected online journal) only to have him brush it aside….*in a stuffy accent* “well if you’re still writing and publishing when your forty, then we will know you have what it takes to be a writer”….just to have him a few months later blow up my Facebook feed with how amazing the journal was and blah blah blah because his wife had a poem published here….

….Don’t even get my started of a few of my friends who decided to start their own journals…..Somehow editing an online webpage and calling it a journal must turn nice rational people into cut-throat, pretentious snobs. Stories. So many….more than I care to share of how the publishing/promotion game has soured perfectly nice people.

It’s like all writers are perpetually stuck in high school, insecure jocks that have to pick on everyone else around them in a desperate attempt to hide the fact that they aren’t gods among men.

But that wasn’t always the case. In the 19th century it was common for established writers to pay for publishing their own books.

(A stolen bit for Wikipedia for you from their vanity press article. Let your “More you know star”shine:)

In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries it was common for legitimate authors, if they could afford it, to pay the costs of publishing their books. Such writers could expect more control of their work, greater profits, or both. Among such authors were Lewis Carroll, who paid the expenses of publishing Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and most of his subsequent work. Mark TwainE. Lynn HarrisZane GreyUpton SinclairCarl SandburgEdgar Rice BurroughsGeorge Bernard ShawEdgar Allan PoeRudyard KiplingHenry David ThoreauWalt Whitman and Anaïs Nin also self-published some or all of their works. Not all of these well-known authors were successful in their ventures; Mark Twain’s publishing business, for example, went bankrupt.[6]

Ernest Vincent Wright, author of the 1939 novel Gadsby, famous for being written entirely in lipogram, was unable to find a publisher for his unusual work and ultimately chose to publish it through a vanity press.

(By the way, if you go back to the early early days of publishing, there are way more writers that are well known that used vanity publishing at one point or another in their career…but anyway back to my own thoughts.)

But the truth is that success or failure is not guarantee your art is good. Emily Dickinson had only a handful of poems published in her lifetime, still she is greatly studied, admired and remembers. Yet, Ursula Guin’s A Wizard of Earthsea which was immensely popular in the 1970’s and was later borrowed heavily upon for a certian scared-wizard series is  almost completely forgotten.

Time and people can only tell us how art stands the test of time and who it can affect. As far as I can see, the more art that is out there, on any level, the more chance for us to grow and discover. And how do you measure success? Frankly, if one poem/essay/play/story I write helps one person, then I consider it a success. And when you consider the ripple effects, well, it’s hard not to make a case for more art in this work isn’t it?

In short, yet blogs, indie publishing and vanity press have no standards. They are the mutts of the art world. But it is still art. And some of it is darn fine. 

So if anyone gives you crap for being , a self-publish artist or vanity press artist, tell them at least you had the guts to do something with you life and put yourself out there.

 All of this makes me just want to run to my piano….the piano doesn’t judge me!

Rant over. Time to get back to playing the game and self-publishing. I have college applications to finish, journals to submit to and the finishing touches on my Nook Book.

Today is the first page….

Today is the first page of a 365 page novel. Make it good!

And since I’m feeling rather adventurous for the new year, I thought I’d reveal the cover art for my ebook of plays! The work was from my best friend, a painter and all-round awesome artist, Ashley Hunt, who now lives out in Buffalo.

final I have just a bit more work on my book (ok really I’m just waiting a few weeks to calm my nerves) but it should be up within a few weeks. And yes, I’m sure I’ll be obnoxious with shooting from the rooftops about it.

Here’s to 2014 being the year you write a best seller with your life.

So this is being an artist?

Can it be? My first book of plays has finally been edited (OK twice now) once through an editor, once through a former classmate of mine (I majored in technical writing and editing) and now I just need to make the final cuts and stick it on Kindle.

Editing is I believe one of my worst enemies....Editing...

Ironic because in college I loved editing. I saw it as a giant puzzle. You have to make the right moves, search the whole of your mind to find just the right word that can make or break a piece. It riveted me in college. I lived for finding lost referents or dangling participial.

But as a writer, creativity swirls around me. At most times, I usually have five or six writing projects going, and it takes most of my energy to set all of my many projects aside to move one ahead.  I live on this,  breath it in.

Editing, for me is the opposite of this. Slow and methodical.  Everything my artistic soul hates.

Besides, I’m a perfectionist, and something about letting my work out there for the world to see, when I’m sure I could make it better ( I can always make it better) is horrifying.

But as I keep telling myself, all of these plays have been produced. It’s time to let them into the world and move on.

I can do it. Can’t I?

And I’m fueling myself with the fact that I signed my first real contract today for my play “The Wall,” I’ll have the details for you when they post it all. 🙂

Time to embrace the writing life.

 

What can you do with 30 days?

“Never regret thy fall,
O Icarus of the fearless flight
For the greatest tragedy of them all
Is never to feel the burning light”
— Oscar Wilde

What can you do in 30 days? Can you just start a career?

I a shying away from calling the month of September a publishing challenge, as I am awful with challenges. Every October      I swear I am going to write a novel, and a week into it, I find that I am completely behind, eventually relenting to my failure.

But as I have grown in my career and my passion for writing, I have come to realize that sometime we all need a push to take us to the next level.

So here is my personal challenge. 30 days. 30 submissions, and at least one a week, posting a short story or poem on my blog.

I know it is going to be rough. But I also know that it will be worth the sweat and tears. Wish me luck.